The Man In the Arena by Theodore Roosevelt

The Man In The Arena by Theodore Roosevelt

Below is one of our favorite inspirational quotes.

It’s hanging on our office wall.

It serves as a reminder for us to focus forward keeping our eye on the goal. Simultaneously, it reminds us to search for solutions while avoiding being ‘just another commentator’:

The Man In The Arena

“It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better.

The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood, who knows the great enthusiasms, the great devotions, and spends himself in a worthy cause; who at best, if he wins, knows the thrills of high achievement, and, if he fails, at least daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who know neither victory nor defeat.”

–  Theodore Roosevelt (1858-1919), 26th President of the United States, Paris, France on April 23, 1910 from his Citizenship in a Republic Speech

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This quote is from the 26th president of the United States, Theodore Roosevelt. Roosevelt was known to be an immensely high achiever. Author of many books, an avid reader, he was a boxer, a 3rd degree black belt, a voracious coffee drinker and it is said he ate 12 eggs a day for breakfast!  He gave this talk as part of his Citizenship in a Republic speech while in Paris, France on April 23, 1910.

Coincidentally, this speech occurred almost four years before World War I, where tragically, almost 6,000,000 (yes, 6 million) French men and women were killed or injured, many of whom undoubtedly attended this event.