How a Lobster Becomes ‘Top Dog’

If you bought the Mental Strength and Brain Chemistry program, you know Dr Brittany Rummel teaches about the four "feel-good" brain chemicals (neurotransmitters).

And from this program you know ...

You can control your own brain chemistry

One of these brain chemicals is serotonin, which regulates one of the unquestionable secrets to your life-long success. That's because one of serotonin's all-important jobs is to help you to get plenty of sleep. But it has many other jobs, too.

If all you did was properly support your serotonin levels chances are high that you might seriously excel in your career. Unfortunately the opposite is true - if you neglect this important neurotransmitter chances are high that life will become much, much harder for you.

Absolutely fascinating research has been done on lobsters. Researchers have noticed a relationship between serotonin levels in lobsters and social status. (1, 2, 3)

The scientists found that the higher their serotonin levels, the better social dominance the lobster had.

They literally became the 'top dog'

But what is also fascinating is that serotonin levels related to "wins" - as defined as 'winning a social conflict'.  (1) After one lobster recently "won", they were more likely to win again, and again - literally creating the habit of winning. (1)

Hmn ... sound familiar?

But even more fascinating is that other lobsters recognized the "winning lobsters" in social situations. They immediately backed down, respected the lobsters and left them alone. (1, 4)

Almost sounds like those with optimized serotonin levels scored the most wins and became the most confident.

Or is it that they were the most confident and then scored the most wins?

References

(1) Dynamic Interactions of Behavior and Amine Neurochemistry in Acquisition and Maintenance of Social Rank in Crayfish: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4807121/
(2) Serotonin and aggression: insights gained from a lobster model system and speculations on the role of amine neurons in a complex behavior.: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10757238/
(3) Serotonin and aggressive motivation in crustaceans: altering the decision to retreat.: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9159179/
(4) 25 Delicious Facts About Lobsters: http://mentalfloss.com/article/57241/25-delicious-facts-about-lobsters